When I worked in the corporate world, one of the final things we were to do before we wound down for the year was our year end review.  We had to sit and write all the things we accomplished over the year and the challenges that we encountered.  Then, with the help of our boss, we worked on goals for the next year and ways to improve.

We had to rank ourselves on our performance.  There were five different levels to chose from – 1 being the worst through 5 being exceptional.  Of course, none of us could rate ourselves exceptional because, as we were told, there was always room for improvement. 

I would sit with my boss and say “I finished this early, we abandoned that, I implemented that, I could improve on such, I worked well with others…” It just seemed like we were being rated on things that we should have learned years ago in school – play well with others, always be on time, finish what you promise, give more than you are asked of and take pride in what you do.

But this year end review – well, I remember most people grumbling over it – except for the ones that were smart enough to keep a running document with everything they did over the year. 

Then I wondered – what if we had to do a year end review each year in our whole life, not just work?  What if we had to review the year – see what our talents and strengths were – and set goals and tasks to strive for?  This could make our days easier.  It would give us a structure to not push off those things we’ll “get to”  Our lives are so full of what we have to get done that we don’t make the space for what we would like to accomplish that will help us grow.  Doing our own yearend review may make us more organized and purposeful for the coming year.

For example, how did we do in the health category?  Did we make all of our doctors’ appointments, exercise, eat right, and take care of those aches and pains or was our life so busy we let things slip? 

Maybe this year we pace ourselves – we find ways to turn down those extra desserts, take a longer walk, take a couple of hours off of work to get a checkup.  These things will keep our vessel, our body in good shape to have the energy to do the things we wish to do.   It will also help us to stay here longer and to complete the mission we’ve been given. 

What about socially?  Did we keep in touch with our friends and family as well as we could have?  What if we scheduled time to call or have a quick bite every once in a while, even if it’s once a month?  Our lives are not that busy that we can’t reach out to those we love because keeping in contact with them helps encourage us down the road, our path, and nourish our heart and souls with love that they provide us.

And for those we did reconnect with, whether it is through facebook or some other method, how did that feel?  Could this be an accomplishment?

We could even expand this out to people who we let go out of our lives – maybe we needed to create space for healthier relationships.  That can be an accomplishment to be discerning enough to know who is uplifting to us.    Or are there people we need to let go – is this one of the goals you can set for next year to create healthy relationships in your life?

As we get older, we work on learning, growing and expanding.  Did we get a chance to read books, take some classes, network – did we take time to expand our brains?  We get a chance to expand our thinking and change the filter that we analyze situations.  Spirit asks us to keep learning so we can respond to situations in a different way.  Our logic and analysis is only as good as the knowledge that we possess.  So we have to flex that mental muscle too.

Seems like a lot so far right?  Wait, there is more.  We'll discuss more tomorrow in Mary's Musings "Accomplishments, Part 2".